Bokhara, Uzbekistan

Bokhara (also spelled Bukhara Bukhoro or Buxoro) is located in Uzbekistan. It was historically one of the largest trading centers along the Silk Road. It is also a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today there are more than 350 mosques and 100 religious institutions In Bukhara.

Bukhara is one of the most ancient cities of Uzbekistan. It is located on a sacred hill, the place of numerous sacrifices made by fire-worshippers mostly in spring. Bukhara was founded in the 13th cent. B.C. in times of Siyavushids power. The name of Bukhara was made from original word “vihara” meaning “monastery” in Sanskrit.

Bukhara lies west of Samarkand and was once learning and educational center throughout the Islamic world. It is also the hometоwn of the great Sheikh Bakhouddin Nakshbandi.

He is famous for the evolvement of the unique Sufi approach to philosophy, religion, and Islam.

Bokhara, Uzbekistan. Minaret and mosque Bokhara former USSR, now Uzbekistan
Minaret and mosque Bokhara former USSR, now Uzbekistan
Legend of Siavash

According to the legend, the city of Bukhara was founded by King Siavash, who was a legendary Persian prince. After his stepmother Sudabeh had accused of an intention to seduce her and betray his father, Siavash went into exile tо Turan. Then, Afrasiab, the King of Samarkand, decided to marry his daughter Ferganiza(Farangis) to him and gave him the vassal kingdom in the Bukhara oasis.

Bokhara, Uzbekistan. Tomb of the Saint, Bokhara former USSR, now Uzbekistan
Tomb of the Saint, Bokhara former USSR, now Uzbekistan

Later, Siavash was accused that he wanted to overthrow King Afrasiab. Finally, he was executed in front of his wife. Siavash’s father sent Rostam was sent by Siavash’s father to Turan and Rostam brought Ferganiza (Farangis) and their son Kai Khosrow back to Persia.

To Visit Bokhara
Book the Legendary Silk Road Tour